Donnerstag 21. September 2017
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career after BOKU graduation

BOKU graduates sum up their experiences

According to the results of the current graduate survey a course of studies at the BOKU cannot be completed as some kind of “side line”; students are most definitely challenged at every turn. Technological and scientific subjects as well as economics provide a great deal of study matter – the teaching of theory, however, is just one part of the effort; all BOKU degree programmes also offer practice in the form of tutorials and trips. In retrospect, graduates see these as particularly valuable.


Nearly all BOKU graduates have good memories of their time as students – some really rave about it. Even if the workload is high, with the right amount of motivation it is well and truly
manageable. Teamwork is often involved; there is a tradition of interaction and mutual support at BOKU – and not only amongst students - their teachers also act in a collegial and supportive fashion. Many graduates mention lecturers who deliver their subject with conviction and enthusiasm. Evidence to date has shown that in comparison with others, BOKU graduates enter employment very rapidly. After six months of job hunting three-quarters of graduates have got their first position. Those holding a doctorate enter the job market fastest because of course they already have higher and more specific qualifications. Three years after completing
their studies nearly all BOKU graduates are in employment; only 0.4% are not in work at this point – either because they are job-hunting or on parental leave.


The majority of graduates report satisfaction in their first years of working: in most cases, occupational requirements match learnt competencies. Of course, willingness to learn
and a thirst for knowledge continue to be important. Interest and individual initiative are of particular relevance to planning and construction activities. And it is also often necessary
to acquire additional knowledge in business administration, as well as in general and staff management to take the next step up the career ladder or seek promotion.
That the overwhelming majority of BOKU graduates, given their time over again, would choose to study at the BOKU and, mostly, would even choose the same course of study, is testimony to how satisfied they are with their training. Many advise people studying now or hoping to do so in the future to consider their future career paths and whether or not they should aim to be generalists or specialists. Other graduates counsel a more open approach to studying and taking a look at a range of possible work options. But all agree that it is especially important to gain as much practical experience as possible while studying, whether through specialised internships in the vacation or part-time jobs. All participants see this as a great advantage, one that clearly outweighs getting through the course as fast as possible, and is useful not least in order to seek out and get to know future employers. Experience abroad and/or knowledge of foreign languages is also a major advantage. On a CV they are seen as showing initiative and
readiness to learn and knowledge thus gained may be used during a person’s working life in a variety of different ways. The graduate survey shows clearly that if they want to achieve
something BOKU students need to approach their studies and new career as independent, autonomous people with a great deal of commitment. But on courses of study at BOKU that
commitment will, without a doubt, pay dividends.

 

These special magazin is available at: Alumni Association, BOKU Augasse 2-6, Unit B, 1. floor, 1090 Vienna, Contact: 01/47654/2022, alumni(at)boku.ac.at

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